brewerfan.net header
About Us    Power 50    Link Report    Daily Brew    Draft    FAQ    Links
Transactions    Player Index    Login    Fan Forum
Lambeau Leap 1250 WSSP  
 
Brewerfan Features
Toby's Power 50
Link Report
Draft
Milwaukee Brewers
Nashville Sounds
Huntsville Stars
Brevard County Manatees
Wisconsin Timber Rattlers
Helena Brewers
Arizona Brewers



  Minor League
Player Search
 
 
 
Powered by
Baseball America

  Major League
Player Search
 
 
 
Powered by ESPN

  Poll
Should Tommy John be in the Hall of Fame?
1. Yes
2. No











 
FAQ
 
 
  Free Agency and Salary Arbitration
 
When can a major-league player file for free agency?
For a player to qualify as a major league free agent, he must have at least six (6) full years of major league service.

How does the free-agent compensation process works?
Every offseason, the Elias Sports Bureau compiles rankings of all major league players, based on the previous two year's stats. The players are ranked by position, so first basemen are not compared to second basemen, etc. The players are then broken down into Type A, Type B and Type C (and the rest).

Type A players are players rated in the top 30 percent of all players at their position. Type B players are players rated in the 31-50 percent bracket at their position. Type C players are players rated in the 51-60 percent bracket at their position. Because the players are only compared to others at their position, some players might be a Type B but seem to be not as good as some Type C players, etc., but that’s how the system works.

When a team loses a free agent who is ranked in one of the three categories, they receive compensation as follows (if and only if they offered that player arbitration before he signed with his new team):

* Type A. Team losing player gets signing team’s first-round pick as well as a supplemental first-round pick. If the signing team is picking in the first half of the first round, they lose their second-rounder instead of their first-rounder.
* Type B. Team losing player gets signing team’s first-round pick. If the signing team is picking in the first half of the first round, they lose their second-rounder instead of their first-rounder.
* Type C. Team losing player gets a supplemental pick after the second round.

If a team doesn't offer arbitration to their free agent, they get nothing when he signs with another team. This brings up the next question of why don't the teams always offer arbitration? The answer is, they might simply be afraid he'll accept it. It's a gamble some teams aren't willing to take, even if it seems likely the player is heading out of town.


When can a minor-league player file for free agency?
Six (6) years after a minor league player’s first season ends with an organization, if the player is not on the major league 40-man roster, he is eligible for minor league free agency. (If a player is on the 40-man roster, this rule does not apply.) Sometimes referred to as a “six-year minor league free agent,” the name comes from six renewable years on a player’s contract.
The rules differ for players who have been released by their first organization before the expiration of the six-year period. When a player signs with a new club, the new club can choose to sign the player for however many years remain before the expiration of their sixth renewable contract.

When does a player become eligible for salary arbitration?
A player with three or more years of service, but less than six years, may file for salary arbitration. In addition, a player can be classified as a "Super-Two" and be eligible for arbitration with less than three years of service. A player with at least two but less than three years of Major League service shall be eligible for salary arbitration if he has accumulated at least 86 days of service during the immediately preceding season and he ranks in the top seventeen percent in total service in the class of Players who have at least two but less than three years of Major League service, however accumulated, but with at least 86 days of service accumulated during the immediately preceding season.

How does a player qualify as a "super-two"?
In order to qualify as a “super-two” player, a player must have accumulated at least 86 days of major league service in the previous season, and be among the top 17 percent in total major league service of all players between two and three years of major league service. The “super-two” distinction does not take ability or production into account.
 

Email This Page   Return to Top   Return Home  
 
Questions? Comments? Contact Brian Kapellusch (president, systems engineer) @
Brewerfan.net is a fan-based independent site, and is NOT affiliated with the Milwaukee Brewers Baseball Club.
Please support the Milwaukee Brewers by visiting their site at http://brewers.mlb.com